SPRINGFIELD – A no-contact order typically instructs a defendant not to have any in-person contact with a victim. However, a law championed by State Senator Melinda Bush (D-Grayslake) will no longer allow them to hound their accuser via text message, email or social media.

Bush SB 1677

“When a person pursues a no-contact order against someone, there is nothing stopping the perpetrator from sending threatening texts or leaving harassing voicemails,” Bush said. “In the age of technology and online dating, far too many people have experienced unwarranted communications after drawing the line.”

Electronic contact – which includes texting, emailing and calling – will now be considered a violation of a person’s stalking no-contact order under Bush’s law. If a person were to break the order, they would face the same repercussions as they would for in-person contact.

Under previous law, electronic contact is not considered means of correspondence. Without the clarification found within Senate Bill 1677, a stalker could contact someone virtually and harass them without facing consequences. 

“Once a no-contact order is in place, no one should have to worry about hearing from their abuser,” Bush said. “As technology evolves, so too must the measures we take to help people feel safe.”  

Senate Bill 1677 was signed into law Friday and takes effect Jan. 1, 2022.

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Springfield Office:
218 Capitol Building
Springfield, IL 62706
Phone: (217) 782-7353

District Office:
10 N. Lake St., Suite 112
Grayslake, IL 60030
Phone: (847) 548-5631