NaloxoneSPRINGFIELD – Senator Melinda Bush (D-Grayslake) issued the following statement in response to the release of the Illinois Naloxone Standing Order:

“Naloxone, or Narcan, is a lifesaving drug that is able to reverse the effects of opioid overdoses, which have been occurring at an alarming rate in Illinois,” Bush said. “In 2015, I championed legislation to make Narcan more accessible and affordable for law enforcement agencies. Since taking effect, Narcan has been used by officers to save lives of Illinoisans across the state. I am pleased that the governor issued an order that will make it even easier for first responders and law enforcement officers to administer Narcan and save lives.”

Under current law, a prescription is needed to dispense naloxone. The Standing Order issued yesterday acts as a prescription and allows pharmacists, pharmacies and opioid overdose education and naloxone distribution programs like law enforcement agencies, health departments and community-based organizations to acquire and distribute naloxone.

Over the past few decades, opioid addiction has become a major problem throughout the state of Illinois. As of last year, Illinoisans were dying of heroin overdoses at twice the rate they were in 1999. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, from 2014 to 2015 the opioid-related death rate in Illinois increased 120 percent.

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Category: Press Releases

Representative Schneider, Senator Duckworth and Mayor Hill announce the STRANDED ActPatch - October 2, 2017 | original article

By Jonah Meadows

Local, state and federal representatives joined Zion Mayor Al Hill Sunday in Hosea Park to announce a new plan to deal with the impact of storing nuclear waste in communities like Zion. U.S. Representative Brad Schneider (D-Deerfield) and Senator Tammy Duckworth announced the Sensible, Timely Relief for America’s Nuclear Districts’ Economic Development (STRANDED) Act, which aims to provide incentives for economic development in places that are storing waste and federal assistance to offset the cost of storage.

The Zion Nuclear Power station operated from 1973 to 1998. There are 1,020 metric tons of nuclear waste from the plant stored on Zion's lakefront. The STRANDED Act would pay $15 per year, per kilogram of nuclear waste to communities storing such waste, meaning Zion could receive $15 million from the program annually.

“Zion and communities like it have been unfairly saddled with storing our nation’s stranded nuclear waste – forced to shoulder the burdens of storage with no compensation in return,” said Schneider. “The federal government needs to make right by these communities. This bill I’m introducing with Sen. Duckworth would bolster Zion’s economic development by finally compensating the city for its storage of the waste, offering tax incentives to encourage private investment and homeownership, and better ensuring access to all available federal resources. Addressing this issue is a matter of basic fairness for the communities paying the price for our government’s failure to find a permanent solution for spent nuclear fuel.”

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Category: In The News

trafficDaily Herald - September 27, 2017 | original article

By Mick Zawislak

Getting through Grayslake on Route 120 can be tough at times, and the going may be a little tougher beginning today with the expected start of a project aimed at making travel smoother.

Weather permitting, the Illinois Department of Transportation will begin a $1.66 million project to connect and synchronize traffic signals and make other upgrades between Route 134 in Hainesville to Route 45 in Grayslake.

Daytime lane closures on Route 120 and on Route 45 south to Winchester Road in Libertyville are expected. Traffic will be reduced to one lane with flaggers when necessary, according to IDOT.

The work in the Route 120 corridor also includes a right-turn lane from westbound Route 120 to Hainesville Road. The project had been delayed by utility conflicts but is back on track.

Signal work will be coordinated through Lake County PASSAGE, a real-time traffic management system based in Libertyville.

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Category: In The News

Senator Melinda BushSPRINGFIELD — Illinois’ most important economic development tool has been reinstated, thanks to a measure from Senator Melinda Bush (D-Grayslake).

House Bill 162 reinstates the Economic Development for a Growing Economy (EDGE) tax credit program, allowing the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity to offer incentives to businesses that create new full-time jobs, retain existing jobs and make capital investments in Illinois.

“It's important for us to have every tool available to attract and retain businesses in Illinois and ensure we can offer incentives that allow us to compete with neighboring states,” Bush said. “I represent an area that borders Wisconsin. The EDGE program is essential in helping border communities like mine stay competitive.”

The bill requires the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity to recapture the economic development funds if the recipient does not fulfill its end of the bargain. That money would then be disbursed to the local workforce investment area.

House Bill 162 was signed into law today. It extends the EDGE credit program through June 30, 2022.


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Category: Press Releases

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